Tag Archives: fashion

Beauty in the Movies: The Secret Garden

Most kids have a book (or series of books) that opens up such a world of wonder it becomes a near obsession. For some it might be Little Women, or Harry Potter, but for me that book was Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. Maybe it’s because growing up in an apartment gardens were foreign and fascinating, or maybe it’s because I’m a Capricorn,  but whatever the reason, I found the story pure magic, and I still do.

The Secret Garden is the story of Mary Lennox (Kate Maberly), a 10-year-old girl, born and raised in colonial India by neglectful parents. As a result, Mary has never had friends and grows up incredibly spoiled and bitter. When her parents die suddenly in an earthquake (in the book it’s a cholera outbreak), Mary finds herself shipped back to England to live with a tortured and often absent uncle (John Lynch) whom she has never met on his sprawling country estate, Misselthwaite Manor.

Not only is the house mysterious, it has an air of melancholy, as though “a spell has been cast upon it”. The housekeeper, Mrs. Medlock (Maggie Smith) keeps Mary locked in her room and refuses to coddle her. The sole kindness Mary encounters is from Martha (Laura Crossley), one of Medlock’s servants who is able to calm her violent temper. It’s only when Mary discovers a secret passage in her room, that she begins to unlock the secrets of the house.


Mary stumbles on a key in the room of her deceased aunt, and learns that it opens the door to a beloved garden left neglected after her aunt’s death. As Mary, and Martha’s animal-charmer brother Dickon (Andrew Knott), set about restoring the garden to its former beauty, Mary finds there are more mysteries to be discovered at Misselthwaite.

Early spring always makes me think of The Secret Garden, the world slowly thawing and coming back to life after a harsh winter. There’s magic in the budding of trees and the blooming of the first daffodils—it’s hope, it’s renewal, not just for the earth, but for ourselves as well. The Secret Garden is a metaphorical story with a heavy dose of magical realism. As the garden blossoms so does Mary, and the effect it has on her is contagious, setting off an awakening throughout Misselthwaite.

Not to sound like an old biddy, but I worry that with all the technology available to kids today they’re missing out on the freedom and enchantment of the outdoors. The Secret Garden highlights such an important part of childhood, not just bonding with friends, but the liberation of being outside and making your own discoveries, even if it’s in your own backyard.

While there are a few small deviations from the original novel in this adaptation by Polish director Agnieszka Holland, it’s by far the most visually beautiful and emotionally effective of the many attempts to bring this story to the screen.

The Secret Garden is a gothic tale, almost Jane Eyre-like with the desolate moors and the ghostly wailing in the night. Holland really captures the darkness in the story and pushes the symbolism as well, Mary’s Aunt’s room is not only vacant, but overgrown in vines like a scene out of Sleeping Beauty.

Frances Hodgson Burnett never saw the success of The Secret Garden during her life, her other novels enjoyed much greater popularity in their time. Over the years the novel began to emerge as her most beloved story, it has a deep resonance, it doesn’t feel like a story for children, but for everyone.

Burnett suffered the loss of her 18 year old son and never really recovered from it, The Secret Garden in many ways was a very personal story for her. It’s about the triumph of hope, of life after loss. It reminds us that even when all the world seems dead, if you’re willing to love, just beneath the surface there is new life waiting to grow.

Sonia Rykiel bow dress
310 GBP – farfetch.com

Isaac Mizrahi turtleneck top
601 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Lace top
7 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

One Vintage vintage top
950 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Paul Joe wool blend coat
335 GBP – theoutnet.com

Karen Walker pleated skirt
$352 – shoplesnouvelles.com

French Connection full mini skirt
$32 – usa.frenchconnection.com

Ribbed socks
25 GBP – brownsfashion.com

Cydwoq lace up ankle booty
375 CAD – gravitypope.com

Hunter shoes
56 GBP – johnlewis.com

All Black t strap shoes
$58 – endless.com

Just Female necklace
18 EUR – welikefashion.com

Rag Bone wide brim hat
$175 – shoptwigs.com

Ribbon hair accessory
$2.95 – omnicheer.com

Skull beanie
$15 – amazon.com

Pinafore Dress (22”)
55 GBP – harrods.com

Vintage Moss Be a Secret Box
$25 – modcloth.com

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Beauty in the movies

Beauty Inspiration: Peggy Moffitt

Last week I talked about spring cleaning and organizing my makeup. What I didn’t mention in that post was that I had tried to accomplish that task before, but this happened instead:

Um yeah, so it’s not the most productive thing to do with an afternoon, but it’s way more fun than cleaning. For this look you need black liquid eyeliner, black and white (frosted) eyeshadow, a good angled brush, and a steady hand. It doesn’t hurt to have a few baby wipes or makeup removing pads in close reach either—they help you get a smooth line and are the best thing for fixing mistakes (buy them in bulk at Costco!).

The ’60s were a great time for makeup, and even though I didn’t have false eyelashes on hand, I was definitely drawing inspiration from Peggy Moffitt for this look. If you’re not familiar with the model and muse, she was famous for her “five-point” haircut given to her by Vidal Sassoon as well as her kabuki-like makeup which became iconic of ’60s style. She often worked with photographers William Claxton and Rudi Gernreich, here are some pictures of her from the ’60s.

Pretty cute right? Definitely a fashion and makeup inspiration!

3 Comments

Filed under cosmetics, fashion

Beauty in the Movies: Clueless

This week for Beauty in the Movies I’m featuring the best ’90s teen film ever, Clueless, which in many ways defined a generation and proved that not all teen movies are created equal.

Clueless catapulted Alicia Silverstone to fame overnight (she was previously referred to as simply “Aerosmith girl”) in the role of Cher Horowitz, the wealthiest, most popular and prettiest airhead in her Beverly Hills high school. Cher is based on the title character in Jane Austen’s novel Emma, and while you can definitely enjoy Clueless without knowing the plot of Emma, it’s pretty fun to draw comparisons.

Cher, like Emma is well-intentioned but completely oblivious to the feelings of those around her—even her own. With the help of her best friend Dionne (Stacey Dash), Cher plays matchmaker to a pair of lonely teachers and then sets about making over new-girl Tai (Brittany Murphy), who is the equivalent of ugly duckling Harriet Smith in Emma.

It takes a while for Cher to realize you can’t force people to be something they’re not, and that in trying to help Tai, she has actually created a monster of sorts. The adaptation was pretty brilliant of Amy Heckerling since Emma really is a clueless teenage girl (ok, she’s 20, but still). Clueless proves the versatility and timelessness of Austen, but also that teen movies don’t all have to be about sex and stupid antics, they can be smart, funny and enjoyed by all ages. Clueless paved the way for films like Mean Girls and (another update of a literary classic) 10 Things I Hate About You.

I saw this film in theaters when it was released in the summer of 1995. I was 11 years old and not yet a teen myself, but the impact it had on all the girls my age (whether you were a popular girl or an outcast) was massive. I remember going back to school that September and suddenly all the girls were wearing knee socks and mini-skirts. Clueless changed fashion almost instantly.

It was the age of grunge, Nirvana, My-So-Called-Life and doc martens, but Clueless brought an infusion of color, of girlishness that was in total opposition to the style that was dominant. I myself, maintained Angela Chase as my role model, but secretly loved the ’60s revival that took hold in the mid ’90s—though at the time I wouldn’t have been caught dead in a pair of knee socks.

The amazing thing about Heckerling’s writing is that she takes the stereotype of the rich, spoiled, popular girl and instead of making her a bitch (like we expect) she makes her endearing and likable, even if she’s shallow at times.

As much as costume designer Mona May deserves credit for changing the face of ’90s fashion, Heckerling has to be praised for the effect she had on ’90s language—specifically slang. “Whatever”, “as if”, “not even”, “I’m Audi”, Heckerling didn’t come up with these phrases (she hung out with teens at Beverly High to get an idea of the language they used) but featuring them in Clueless made them part of American teenage (and general) vernacular.

Hidden among the snappy dialogue and the colorful outfits, Clueless has a pretty important message about acceptance, self-awareness and peer pressure. Not pressure in relation to sex or drugs, but the pressure to be a certain way, to hang out with the right people (even if they’re jerks) and to wear the right clothes. Clueless is as relevant today as ever, the kids who were born the year it came out are exactly the age of these characters now, which makes me feel really old, but I hope they’ve all seen this movie, it’s a modern classic that remains as funny and honest today as it did 16 years ago.

Also, RIP Brittany Murphy, and may you forever be rollin’ with the homies.

Clueless

Clueless by justinez featuring cotton blouses

Dolce Gabbana white cut out dress
875 GBP – matchesfashion.com

Calvin Klein spaghetti strap dress
314 GBP – farfetch.com

Clemens en August cotton blouse
$98 – theoutnet.com

Sheer top
$65 – modcloth.com

H by Henry Holland yellow cardigan
18 GBP – debenhams.com

Petite Collection cotton cardigan
18 GBP – debenhams.com

Dolce Gabbana plaid skirt
$361 – theoutnet.com

D G pleated skirt
329 GBP – profilebrighton.co.uk

Acne ripped jeans
172 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Vanessa bruno
26 GBP – theoutnet.com

A P C Madras mini skirt
$68 – lagarconne.com

Fogal cashmere tight
80 EUR – pret-a-beaute.com

Plaid skirt
$35 – modcloth.com

Mini skirt
$26 – chloelovescharlie.com

Knee high socks
$15 – topshop.com

Over the knee socks
$13 – delias.com

Old Navy plaid skirt
$9.97 – oldnavy.gap.com

Delighter
6.90 GBP – irregularchoice.com

Ernesto Esposito mary jane pumps
208 EUR – luisaviaroma.com

Biviel t strap pumps
$99 – endless.com

Christian Dior fur handbag
bagborroworsteal.com

Aspinal of London vintage handbag
495 GBP – johnlewis.com

Leatherbay leather bag
$130 – endless.com

Tarina Tarantino lucite necklace
$70 – tarinatarantino.com

Forever21 flower necklace
$7.80 – canada.forever21.com

Jewelry
$4.99 – debshops.com

John Lewis Women black hat
29 GBP – johnlewis.com

Gucci Classic Logo Rucksack
570 GBP – profilebrighton.co.uk

Ivy & Moon Long Camisole (Big Girls)
$12 – nordstrom.com

Hair Scrunchie (optional)
3.95 GBP – harrods.com

MARLENA GREY+SILVER -ARMOR LAMPER
$120 – dmusastore.com

7 Comments

Filed under Beauty in the movies

Guest Post: Maria’s 5 Fashionable Female Leads in Film

In place of ‘Beauty in the Movies’ this week I present to you a guest post in which the lovely and talented Maria Rainier shares her ‘top five favorite fashionable films’—now that’s a mouthful! Enjoy, and many thanks to Maria.

***************************

Disclaimer: I am no expert on fashion.  In fact, one of the last things I notice in a movie—after cinematography, script, acting, editing, what other movies the actors and actresses were in—is what said actors and actresses are wearing.  If their acting is impressive and they have nice smiles, that’s usually as deep as I’ll go.

See, that’s what makes the following list special: I don’t pay much attention to fashion, but the following actresses had something going on strong enough to make me remember to look at my own closet after the movie was done.

Marion Cotillard in Public Enemies

Marion plays Billie Frechette, who, until meeting the dangerous and dashing John Dillinger, hasn’t had much opportunity to wear anything nice.  She pulls off Depression Era glam like few actresses could.

I find myself envying her circa 1930s bob and fur-lined coats because a) I could never get my hair to look like that and b) I’m an animal lover and even prefer not to wear faux fur.  So much for that.

Audrey Tautou in Amélie

A girl as sweet, childlike, and silly as Amélie could only wear light, delicate, feminine fabrics.  She’s the girl who can effortlessly pull off polka-dots or stripes, lots of red and green, and a (circa 5th grade) my-mom-cut-my-hair trim without looking like, well, a 5th grader.

Everything she wears is endearing and simple—old-fashioned camisoles, mandarin collars, a-line skirts, and a simple retro flair.

Much of it says that Amélie doesn’t really care how she looks as long as it’s comfortable and fits—she’s too busy trying to make the world a nicer place, anyway.

Angelina Jolie in Mr. & Mrs. Smith

If I have a girl-crush on anyone, it’s Angie, if nothing for the fact that she can pull off a leather S&M outfit, a classy black dress, and a suit jacket in the same movie.  Anyone would agree that although Angelina’s perfect bone structure and pouty lips are her claim to fame, it’s her confidence that really screams, “I’ll wear what I want.”

I mean, what does she have to be insecure about (besides her failing marriage, of course)?  She’s a successful spy, she works in a skyscraper with high-tech computers and pressed suits, and she can escape a sticky situation with a zipline and a handgun.

Okay, most of us don’t have these things or the kind of confidence that goes with them.  Still, if all of us were half as comfortable in our own skins as Angelina appears to be, at least in this film as Mrs. Smith, the world would be a much sexier place.

Mila Kunis in Book of Eli

No, I don’t think we should all stop washing our clothes and wear overalls everywhere.

If anyone convinced me to buy a pair of Oakleys, though, it was Mila Kunis (and everyone else in Book of Eli).

Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s

If you ever wondered where the idea of the “little black dress” came from, you’re looking at her now.

Lovely Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly embodies timeless glam in this Hollywood classic, complete with huge pearls, thick sunglasses, and simple makeup choices.

 

 

Maria Rainier is a freelance writer and blog junkie. She is currently a resident blogger at First in Education where she writes about education, online degrees, and what it takes to succeed as a student getting an online associates degree remotely from home. In her spare time, she enjoys square-foot gardening, swimming, and avoiding her laptop.

 

5 Comments

Filed under celebrity

Beauty in the Movies: Pleasantville

This week’s film passes the Bechdel test, but features both prominent female and male characters. Although I usually focus on strong female leads, it’s important to note the real goal is equal presence and development of both sexes on film. While Pleasantville does have strong female characters, it is really a story about liberation for all.

Jennifer and David are teenage twins from a broken home. Jennifer (Reese Witherspoon) is popular and promiscuous (FYI: singer Jenny Lewis makes a brief appearance as one of her friends), while her brother David (Tobey Maguire) is shy and geeky. He’s also obsessed with a black & white Leave It To Beaver-esque TV show called Pleasantville which he sees as a perfect world, unlike the one he is living in.

David and Jennifer don’t get along, and after fighting for control of the TV and breaking the remote, Don Knotts appears at their door as a mysteriously chipper TV repairman. He gives them a new remote which transports them into the sterile, black & white world of Pleasantville, where they have two happily married parents (Joan Allen and William H. Macy), and nothing bad ever happens.

There are no fires or death in Pleasantville, there’s also no need for toilets and no such thing as sex. David wants to play their parts while they figure out how to get home, but free-spirited ’90s woman Jennifer proves unable to assimilate so easily. When she seduces her chaste TV boyfriend, Skip (Paul Walker), she unwittingly brings about a revolution.

David sets change in motion as well when he accidentally introduces the idea of free will to Mr. Johnson (Jeff Daniels), his boss at the soda shop. As creativity and curiosity begin to blossom throughout Pleasantville, so do hatred and ignorance, turning this “perfect” world completely on its head.

The metaphor in this film is obvious but also effective. Not only as an illustration of the absurdity of racism, but also that the price we pay for perfection is imagination. Pleasantville is the garden of Eden and woman is once again the cause for its downfall, but in this reality the expulsion is actually an emancipation.

Gary Ross, the writer and director, has said his intention wasn’t to make a feminist statement, especially in regard to Joan Allen’s character. However, since equality and repression are both major themes of the film and Joan Allen is a fantastic actress, intentional or not, her story arc is the most compelling and does convey a feminist message.

Pleasantville received Academy Award nominations for Best art direction, best costume design, and best original score (by Randy Newman), all of which were well deserved.  The film was shot in color, mostly on digital, and then selectively desaturated, which makes for striking visuals.

Pleasantville drops us into a society that is still longed for by many Americans, a world without sin or emotion, and then shows us how stifling it would be to live there. It’s a simple idea with complex repercussions and overall it’s beautiful and magical to watch—what more could you want?

Beauty in the Movies: Pleasantville
Beauty in the Movies: Pleasantville by justinez featuring a yellow cardigan

Dress
99 GBP – vivienofholloway.com

Vintage dress
150 GBP – lovemissdaisy.com

Knit cardigan
$75 – topshop.com

Dorothy Perkins short cardigan
22 GBP – dorothyperkins.com

River Island peter pan collar blouse
25 GBP – riverisland.com

Cardigan
95 GBP – lkbennett.com

Oasis summer tee
45 GBP – johnlewis.com

Eastex yellow cardigan
60 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

Dorothy Perkins short sleeve top
17 GBP – dorothyperkins.com

Bennett
75 GBP – lkbennett.com

Giambattista Valli tweed pencil skirt
441 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Alice by Temperley pleated skirt
$126 – theoutnet.com

La Perla bullet bra
$86 – journelle.com

Pleaser halloween costume shoes
$28 – endless.com

Rupert Sanderson high heel shoes
$575 – boutique1.com

Vintage leather handbag
$35 – modcloth.com

Vintage handbag
$40 – modcloth.com

Vintage clutch
$35 – modcloth.com

Double strand pearl necklace
$99 – myjewelrybox.com

Monet pearl earring
25 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

Vintage glove
$20 – modcloth.com

Vintage hat
$40 – modcloth.com

American apparel
$8 – americanapparel.net

Marc by Marc Jacobs gold hair accessory
$22 – couture.zappos.com

Old Navy hair accessory
$3.50 – oldnavy.gap.com

Poodle Skirt
69 GBP – irregularchoice.com

Estee Lauder Radiant Bloom Powder Compact
$175 – bergdorfgoodman.com

Pride and Prejudice
$20 – modcloth.com

3 Comments

Filed under Beauty in the movies

Beauty in the Movies: Orlando

I have featured a lot of mainstream films recently, so I decided this week I should go with a film that might not be as well-known, but definitely deserves attention. That film is Sally Potter’s masterful retelling of Virginia Woolf’s novel Orlando.

Orlando is a difficult film to describe, but I’ll do my best. The year is 1600, Orlando (Tilda Swinton) is a young man of noble birth chosen by the elderly Queen Elizabeth I (Quentin Crisp) as her favorite. The Queen gives Orlando an estate and the promise of fortune for his heirs, on one condition; he must never wither and fade, he must not grow old. The queen soon dies and in the frozen winter of 1610 the young Lord falls in love with Sasha (Charlotte Valandrey) the daughter of the Muscovite ambassador, and learns of the pain of heartbreak.

Time marches on and Orlando remains the same, a century passes as he dabbles in poetry only to be laughed at for being a man of wealth without talent. To escape his loneliness the young man agrees to act as ambassador to King Charles II and soon finds himself in Constantinople. On his journey to self-discovery he learns that engaging in battle, a requirement of men at the time, is unbearable for him. One morning Orlando awakes to find he has metamorphosed into a woman. He is exactly the same person, simply a different sex. What follows is a look at the absurd gender biases the now Lady Orlando must face. I’ll leave it at that, and hope you watch the film yourself.


Orlando is born an innocent child of the natural world. As a nobleman he does not behave as such, but rather looks at life with the curiosity and naivety of a child. Orlando’s nobility is directly responsible for his melancholy and loneliness. While he has a magnificent house and title, he spends most of his life in solitude with his servants and dogs. He, and later she, is entranced by beauty and desperate to experience love. The poets whom she worships and the characters she meets are sometimes disappointing, but from her experiences she learns the ways of the world and comes to understand humanity. It’s through this understanding of life that she eventually discovers the happiness she has sought for hundreds of years.

This isn’t a story about suspense or action, in fact there are moments of silence where the camera simply holds on Orlando conveying so much meaning it seems other films move much too fast. In order to enjoy the story you really need to suspend disbelief, put aside any questions of logic, and just except what is happening as easily as the characters do. Orlando is an epic of individuality, it doesn’t tangle itself in plot or shove the meaning down your throat. It’s an art film, so maybe it’s a bit abstract in places, but that’s what makes it so enjoyable.

Whether the story makes sense to you or not, this film is a feast for the senses. It’s a visual knock-out, each new setting different from the last, but equally stunning. The costumes are gorgeous, as is the scenery which was almost entirely shot on location rather than on film sets. The result is a film that is an ode to nature and makes you wish more films would utilize of the world around us rather than re-create it.

I don’t believe this film would have been possible without Tilda Swinton, she slips so easily from male to female making what could have easily been an awkward performance into something understated and believable. She is truly hypnotizing to watch, not just because of her unique beauty but also her incredible ability to express emotion through the most subtle changes in her expression.

This film is exceptional because it is a work of art, a study in gender, and so different from anything else out there. Sally Potter is a visionary and I cannot stress enough how important it is to support female directors since there are so few out there considering that we populate half the world. Orlando is the sort of film that sticks with you, not because it has a surprise ending or explosive action, but because it makes you think about life and identity while providing you with thrilling beauty. Give it a try, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

GMS 75 leather jacket
$895 – mytheresa.com

Bringhurst Shirt
49 GBP – aubinandwills.com

Dorothy Perkins harem pants
30 GBP – dorothyperkins.com

Sternlein opaque tight
24 GBP – fashion-conscience.com

Knee high boot
585 CAD – gravitypope.com

Purplow low heels
$208 – yesstyle.com

Embroidered canvas bag
atelier-mayer.com

Conroy Wilcox garnet earring
$1,720 – stuartandwright.com

Victorian brooch
$1,599 – westonjewelry.com

Lanvin choker necklace
$760 – barneys.com

Bridal earring
atelier-mayer.com

AZ Collection flower brooch
$219 – forzieri.com

Garnet ring
$169 – amazon.com

LK Designs metal necklace
82 EUR – pret-a-beaute.com

Kate Spade post earring
$45 – zappos.com

TopShop faux fur hat
$55 – topshop.com

Sashes | Shop | LaDress.com
35 EUR – ladress.com

Scrap – Page 10
encatimini.centerblog.net

Mark
classicpartsltd.com

3 Comments

Filed under Beauty in the movies

Oscar Beauties

I, like many, watch the Oscars for the clothes. If everyone was wearing jeans and sneakers it just wouldn’t be such a big deal. It’s the gowns, the hair, and the insanely expensive jewelry that make it worth watching. Those displays of glamour that most of us will never get to touch in our lifetimes so we live them vicariously through celebrities instead.

The whole idea of the Oscars is way overblown, it’s great that celebrities have awards ceremonies just like many other professions do, but the seriousness with which the show is presented makes the event seem a touch too self-congratulatory. For a show that is celebrating entertainment it never comes off as light and fun, it’s aggrandized and phony, plus there’s something incredibly dated about it. Obviously the Academy knows this and therefore chose “young and hip” actors Anne Hathaway and James Franco to host this year. Unfortunately it didn’t really work so well.

The result was Hathaway and Franco appearing uncomfortable with the grandness of the show—Anne Hathaway literally seemed like she was playing dress up and trying a bit too hard (though who could blame her?), and Franco’s way of dealing with the pressure was to act totally bored. The set, the overly dramatic music, and the cheesy writing all seem to stay the same year after year. You would think this time around with the push to appeal to younger viewers they would have changed things up aside from just the hosts. It’s weird because if the Oscars are really just an award show to celebrate achievements in the field of cinema, why do they need to appeal to anyone?

Anyway, like I said, I tune in for the clothes. The show itself drags on forever and always seems disappointing because nothing all that interesting happens. As awards shows go, it’s the biggest, but it’s also the most stuck-up which means all the stars are nervous and on their best behavior, which makes things boring. Pretty dresses however, are always fun to look at. This year my favorite by far was Mila Kunis in Elie Saab, I’m a sucker for purple. I like it when people take risks so I might be in the minority of people who loved Cate Balnchett’s Givenchy gown as well. Here are some other things I liked:

Michelle Williams and her simple but pretty hair, makeup, and earrings. She always gets it right, but also manages to keep things interesting at the same time.

Hailee Steinfeld’s youthful makeup, and her eyebrows which were thankfully left alone rather than plucked into oblivion leaving her looking as beautiful and happy as any 14-year-old at the Oscars should be.

I think it’s so funny when people on E! or other red carpet fashion round-ups make fun of Helena Bonham Carter because obviously she doesn’t give two shits what any of them think and she just wears what she wants. How can you not love that? I love her hair, her fan, her husband, and the way she sticks to her personal style no matter what.

I didn’t love Nicole Kidman’s dress, but I did love her big diamond necklace from Fred Leighton.
Also wasn’t a fan of Reese Witherspoon’s 90s prom looking black-and-white dress, but I did quite like her big sixties hair.
Anne Hathaway showed once again that she is at heart a (sometimes awkward) musical theater geek, but her Lanvin tuxedo was cute, and I especially like her custom Swarovski crystal covered heels.
Let’s hear it, who wore your favorite gowns, hair, or accessories?

9 Comments

Filed under celebrity, fashion