Tag Archives: pink

Beauty in the Movies: Mean Girls

This week for Beauty in the Movies I ask you to head back to what was either the best or worst time in your life—high school, in the hysterically funny and alarmingly accurate film Mean Girls.

Cady Heron (Lindsay Lohan) grew up in Africa where she was home-schooled by her research zoologist parents, but at 16 after her mom lands a tenure teaching position she finds herself thrown into a new kind of  jungle; the American high school. Cady quickly learns that the poisonous snakes and carnivorous cats of her former home have nothing on the teenage girls who roam the halls of North Shore High. She is adopted by creative misfits Janice (Lizzy Caplan) and Damien (Daniel Franzese) who give her the low-down on the school’s social hierarchy starting at the top of the food chain with Regina George (Rachel McAdams) and her dim cronies Gretchen Wieners (Lacey Chabert) and Karen Smith (Amanda Seyfried), who they’ve aptly nicknamed “The Plastics”. When the Plastics unsurprisingly take an interest in the hot new girl, Janice convinces Cady to infiltrate the group and expose Regina for the evil bitch she really is. She agrees, but being new to the dangerous world of girls she is easy prey for the cruel trickery of The Plastics, especially Regina. Before Cady knows it she is turning into cold, hard, shiny, plastic herself.

There are “plastics” in every school, they are equally worshiped and hated. Some are evil, but most are just lost or trying to fit in and win enough favor to avoid being tortured. I myself can relate so closely to the character of Janice that I find it eerie. It’s comforting to know that girls like me are just as prevalent as girls like Regina George in high schools across the country, most likely Tina Fey was one of them too. Janice is a direct reaction to Regina, she is the antithesis of everything the Plastics represent. While her plan to bring down Regina is fueled by revenge, fighting fire with fire is never a good idea, and although she has the best intentions, it’s hard not to see her, and Damien, as mean girls too.

This film has a great ensemble cast, Tina Fey and other SNL talents deliver laughs as expected (particularly Amy Poehler as Regina’s “cool” mom), McAdams, Chabert and Seyfried eat up the scenery and steal the show with their pitch-perfect teen girl hysterics and bitchery. Watching this film I can’t help but be sad about what has become of Lyndsay Lohan, she is so cute and brimming with potential in this role. Many of us thought this was just the first of many charming performances, but sadly both her career and her personal life seem to have gone downhill since Mean Girls hit theaters. I still remain hopeful that it’s just a phase and the bubbly, bright, redheaded girl onscreen in this movie will leave the tabloid madness behind and make a comeback sometime in the future—stay strong Lyndsay!

Tina Fey wrote her screenplay based on the book Queen Bees and Wannabes by Rosalind Wiseman. Wiseman’s book was written as a guide to help mothers understand the confusing and often brutal world their daughters navigate everyday. Tina Fey is a comic genius and this film proves that. She took instances from the book that many women could relate to and found not only humor in the ridiculous way girls treat each other, but also an opportunity to send a message without seeming preachy. Teenage girls can be ruthless and Mean Girls holds up the mirror, the actions of the girls may seem absurd, but if you’ve spent time with teens—and unfortunately some grown women as well, you know this film is filled with truth.

One of Mean Girls greatest moments comes when Fey’s character attempts to breakthrough to her female students “you’ve got to stop calling each other sluts and whores, it just makes it ok for guys to call you sluts and whores” she begs. Before women can be respected by men, we have to respect one another and see other women as our equals instead of our opponents. It’s a deeply valuable lesson for women of all ages and it simply cannot be repeated often enough. Gossip and name calling are as innocent as a sucker-punch to the face, if we don’t take those abuses seriously then we deserve the sort of leaders that are born of that behavior. The sad part is that, like Cady, most girls and women have a natural instinct to be a friend, but all it takes is one mean girl to put everyone else on the defensive. The best way to deal with a queen bee is not to give her any power and the only way to do that is to be yourself no matter what she thinks of you.

While there are many aspects of the film that could come off as cliché, it wouldn’t be high school without them. Archetypes are more prevalent in high school than anywhere else—the jock, the homecoming queen, the lap-dog, and so on. For some it’s a survival method; stick with the pack, go unnoticed, avoid abuse. For others, it’s the opposite, if you can’t fit in then be as different as possible and embody it to the fullest—the goth, the stoner, the nerd. Most of us fit into some category when we were in high school. Whether we chose our character to blend in, or had it thrust upon us as a way of sticking out, as adults we have learned we can be many things at once. Yes, you can be prom queen and a mathlete at the same time, and it actually makes you more interesting in the end.

At one point Cady comes to the realization that “calling someone else fat doesn’t make you any skinnier” and the same goes for any mean thing you can say about someone, it doesn’t do anything to change why you feel bad about yourself. Which is really the only reason we talk about each other aside from plain old boredom. In the end there is a lesson for all women in this film; stop being so mean to each other. It’s a hard habit to break after so many years of practice and reinforcement, but if we work together instead of tearing one another down there is no doubt we could rule the world.

Emilio Cavallini stretch dress
120 EUR - pret-a-beaute.com

Juicy Couture velour top
149 EUR - jades24.com

Red Herring wrap top
22 GBP - debenhams.com

Pringle of Scotland argyle top
$795 - net-a-porter.com

Black top
$77 - wildfoxcouture.com

Red Herring red top
17 GBP - debenhams.com

Love Moschino cap sleeve top
135 GBP - harveynichols.com

Juicy couture pants
130 EUR - luisaviaroma.com

Marc Jacobs tweed skirt
$495 - net-a-porter.com

Old navy skirt
$7.97 - oldnavy.gap.com

TopShop leather skirt
$125 - topshop.com

Tiered skirt
20 GBP - binbin.net

Maje tiered ruffle skirt
68 GBP - net-a-porter.com

Abercrombie Fitch polka dot skirt
$50 - abercrombie.com

Christian louboutin shoes
$795 - footcandyshoes.com

Nine West black pump shoes
$40 - nordstrom.com

Cherry bag
channeladvisor.com

Louis Vuitton multicolor handbag
bagborroworsteal.com

PikaPika round necklace
$115 - yesstyle.com

Rue21 hoop earring
$6.99 - rue21.com

Handmade jewelry
$49 - peggyli.com

Heart belt
$32 - topshop.com

dELiAs > Nail Polish >
$4.50 - delias.com

rabbit ears
3.50 GBP - sillyjokes.co.uk

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Beauty in the Movies: She-Devil

I can’t believe this movie isn’t on DVD, it’s really a shame because it’s totally underrated and deserves to be viewed by a new generation. Thank goodness it is now streaming on Netflix for your enjoyment, so don’t miss out!

Loosely based on the novel by Fay Weldon, She-Devil gives us the story of Ruth Patchett (Roseanne) a clueless, frumpy, housewife in 1980s suburbia. She is verbally abused and neglected by her husband Bob (Ed Begley Jr.), and finally snaps when she can no longer ignore his blatant affair with romance novelist Mary Fisher (Meryl Streep). In a rage, Ruth vows to destroy all of her husband’s “assets” as he calls them. She burns down their house, drops the kids off with Bob at his mistress’s pink mansion, and heads off to start a new life driven by revenge.

As Ruth’s plans succeed, Mary’s life begins to crumble. Mary wanted Bob, and now she has him—and his children, and his infidelity, and thanks to Ruth, Mary’s loud-mouthed, elderly mother (who Mary had been keeping sedated at Golden Twilight Nursing home for years) shows up on her door step as well.

As Mary’s life falls apart, Ruth’s life blossoms, she renames herself Vesta Rose and opens a women’s employment agency with her friend Hooper (Linda Hunt). The Vesta Rose agency helps “women who the world threw away” by turning them into successful, strong, working women. At the same time, these women provide Ruth with an army that aids her in achieving vengeance over those who’ve wronged her, so she is doing good while doing bad.

She-Devil is, more than anything else, a film about fantasy. Mary writes bodice ripping romance novels and delivers her own fantasy to a legion of women who need the escape. Ruth herself once bought into Mary’s novels, but when her reality comes into sharp focus she brings Mary’s world crashing down to Earth along with her, bursting her pink bubble of fantasy by delivering Mary the responsibilities and stresses most of her readers are all too familiar with.

I honestly don’t think this film would work without Meryl Streep, you have to respect a woman who after winning a couple of Oscars, decides to do a movie like this one. I’m sure there are tons of critics who think it’s ridiculous, but there is no way you can watch this movie and not think Meryl is having a ball playing the ridiculous, vain, selfish, Mary Fisher. She gives a flamboyantly funny performance and when you’re as good an actress as she is, you can choose the roles you want to play without worrying that you won’t be taken seriously—and besides, being funny is a whole heck of a lot harder than being serious any day.


In essence, She-Devil is the ultimate revenge fantasy of every wronged woman. Ruth not only gives back what she got and them some, but she embraces her freedom and starts a new life by helping other women who’ve been abused and beaten down. Ruth’s wrath doesn’t burn her up, it renews her, she rises up from the ashes of her old life, and finds a new purpose. She doesn’t find a prince charming, and she does use other people to serve herself, but it’s almost refreshing to see that in a film, especially since nowadays every comedy seems so moralistic. All the characters do despicable things, they’re cliches—but sometimes we all are, so why not have a laugh about it?

She-Devil

She-Devil by justinez featuring a bodice dress

Preen dresses PINK
418 GBP - matchesfashion.com
Pink evening dress »

Silk-satin blouse
$139 - theoutnet.com
Long sleeve tops »

White Linen Jacket
39 GBP - debenhams.com
Windsmoor »

Vanishing Floral Wide Pant
$420 - zimmermannstore.com
Floral pants »

Shantung skirt Pink
20 GBP - houseoffraser.co.uk
Pink skirt »

Pointy Pumps
$42 - yesstyle.com
Pumps »

PARIS
89 GBP - kurtgeiger.com
Evening bags clutches »

Oval Pearl Clip Earring
$50 - amritasingh.com
Oval jewelry »

Pink Chiffon Rose Ring
3 GBP - talullahtu.co.uk
Pink jewelry »

Rawnie Hat in Blanco
$295 - simplysoles.com
Summer hats »

Classic Silk Ladies Gloves
$85 - aspinaloflondon.com
Silk gloves »

Silk Scarf with Polka Dot
$80 - aspinaloflondon.com
Wrap scarves »

Estee Lauder All Day Lipstick
$18 - nordstrom.com


Charm Pen
$360 - louisvuitton.com


Christine fleurs -
data0.eklablog.com


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Filed under Beauty in the movies

Beauty in the Movies: Mermaids

Looking back at images of beauty that have made a great impression on me throughout my life, I’ve noticed that there are films which have left a permanent mark on what appeared as beautiful to me, both in ways that I could relate to, and also in admiration of the beauty of others. As Netflix likes to tell me, many of my favorite films feature “strong female leads”, which is true. Unfortunately, they make very few movies that fall in to that realm. In fact there is this thing called the-Bechdel-test which is a way of gauging the prevalence of female representation in movies. It was created by a very smart woman named Allison Bechdel. You can read all about it here, but the basis of the test involves asking these three questions about any movie:

1. Are there two or more women in it who have names?

2. Do the two women ever talk to each other?

3. Do they talk to each other about something other than a man?

When you first read these questions you think, “God that’s silly, of course tons of movies must answer all three of those questions positively” and then you stop and think for a minute and go “wait, oh my god, that sucks, why are there no movies for women that don’t revolve around men or shopping? AHHH” and then you get really upset until you go watch Mermaids and Cher sings and cheers you up, and you remember that there are some good movies for us females.

We should promote and encourage more films that explore all aspects of female existence to be made. Because really, as much as relationships are a part of life, there are so many more topics to cover, and women really seem to just get pigeonholed into these love-sick shopaholics, and we are all so much more than that aren’t we?

So anyway, my point is, every week (on Friday because it’s movie night, duh!) I am going to post about one of these great movies that actually show the diversity of women, and also gives us inspiring images of beauty both in and out. So send me your suggestions too! I’ll make fun collages, it will be great!


Now let me get to Mermaids, this movie had a profound effect on my life when I was 7, I wanted to be Cher, Winona Ryder and Christina Ricci all at once. I loved this movie so much, and still do, that I’d like to share a little anecdote.

Here is a picture of my sister and I in matching outfits (my mother claims this only happened a few times, but I think it happened more) you can see by my sister’s dress that the skirt is supposed to be loose and A-line. Well, I wanted to be just like Cher, so in this big family photo, I decided to knot my skirt in the back so it would be tight like Cher’s right before my dad snapped the photo. I was a pretty bad ass kid. Nobody even noticed, but I was happy, and I still get a kick out of looking at it.

Mermaids centers around the story of Rachel Flax, a single mom who moves to a small Massachusetts town with her two daughters (Ryder and Ricci) in 1963. She cuts sandwiches into fun shapes with cookie cutters, wears fabulous outfits, and actually has a realistic relationship with her kids. Winona Ryder’s character, Charlotte, falls for the hunky groundskeeper (Jake from Sixteen Candles) at the nearby convent, and struggles with questions of religion, sex, and abandonment by her father. The movie also covers Kennedy’s assassination, an adorable Christina Ricci as a swimming champion, Bob Hoskins making an amazing night-light, and so much more.  There is a great soundtrack too, my favorite camp counselor used to have us sing The Shoop Shoop Song (Does he love Me?) on the bus, it was the best summer.

So if you’ve never seen Mermaids (or even if you have) I highly recommend checking it out, and if you find yourself as inspired by Cher’s sexy, fun, 60′s looks in the film as I was, here is a little shopping guide to help you get the look:

Puckered Sleeve Dot Cardigan
$24 - canada.forever21.com
More cardigans »

Top
$650 - marni.com
More Marni tops »

 

darla bracelet
25 GBP - coast-stores.com
More bracelets »

Black False Lashes
$6 - mydivascloset.com


Have a great weekend everyone!

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Filed under Beauty in the movies